Senior Pet Blood Test

Health conditions in later life can severely affect the overall quality of life of our pets. However, many of the problems associated with the onset of old age are manageable if diagnosed early, significantly prolonging the life and well being of senior pets.

 

When is a pet considered senior?

This will vary with breed and condition but in general a cat or small to medium-sized dog is considered senior from 10 years of age; large dogs such as Rottweilers and German Shepherds, from 8 years; and giant breeds such as Great Danes and Bull Mastiffs, from 6 years of age.

 

Why does my pet need a ‘Senior Pet Check’?

As with humans, there can be changes taking place inside your pet that are not always evident from the outside. This is particularly the case with older animals and so the ‘Senior Pet Check’ has been designed to detect these changes and the onset of disease early, when your vet is in the best position to take remedial action.

 

What does a ‘Senior Pet Check’ entail?

When you take your pet to your vet for a ‘Senior Pet Check’, he/she will give your pet a general physical examination and take a blood sample. Depending on your pet’s history and physical condition and factors like breed and age, your vet may take other samples including urine and samples of any visible lumps or bumps. The reasons for additional sampling will be explained to you and will proceed only with your consent.

 

What happens after the samples have been collected?

Your vet will send the blood and any other samples away to a veterinary laboratory for further testing. These tests will provide an overall assessment of your pet’s health and will include tests to measure the condition of the liver and kidneys, and tests that look specifically for infection, anaemia and some types of cancer. The test results are then returned to your vet who will advise you of the outcome and any subsequent treatment, such as dietary changes and/or medication.